Issue 27

issue date: june 2011

Contents

TURKEY ENTERING INTO THE EUROPEAN UNION THROUGH THE BALKAN DOORS: IN THE STYLE OF A GREAT POWER!?

Bedrudin Brljavac

Summary

Confronting an increasing EU opposition from a number of influential member states to its membership the AKP government adopted a multilateral approach to its foreign policy making resulting in dynamic economic and diplomatic policies with the countries from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Balkans region. In this article we analyzed the effects and consequences of a paradigmatic shift in Turkish foreign policy in the western Balkans in relation to the country’s EU membership prospects. Through its pro-active economic and diplomatic initiatives in the region Turkey has been proving itself as indispensable country for the European Union membership. Thus, if the Turkish government concentrates more on solving its internal problems and continues its pro-active diplomacy in western Balkans, among other regions, it could become not only a regional but also a global power.

RISE OF CHINA’S NAVY FROM REGIONAL TO GLOBAL NAVY

Danijel Nekić

Summary

In the last thirty years China has had incredible economic growth that is unprecedented in the world history. Continued economic growth has led to the fact that China is becoming increasingly dependent on sea lines of communication through which the majority of economic products are exported, and most raw materials and energy are imported. The disintegration of the Soviet Union and, therefore, the disappearance of the major external military threats, has led in new geopolitical circumstances to rapid development of the China’s Navy, which is slowly transforming from a regional to a global naval force which the main task will be protection of China’s global economic and national interests, and sea lines of communication vital to attaining the status of world power.

SECURITY OF THE REGULAR NUCLEAR WEAPONS

Alenko Vrđuka

Summary

Twenty five thousand nuclear warheads are deployed by nine countries and they are not kept under equally good security measures. Many international treaties are reached and, on daily basis, measures are taken on bilateral and national level to decrease the danger of proliferation of nuclear weapons. From the other side, illegal obtaining of nuclear weapon as a threat doesn’t depend just on security measures and prevention of nuclear proliferation, but on existence of motivated subjects who have financial, organizational and personnel capacities needed for such an act. The fear that forthcoming nuclear threat will not come from states but from terrorists appeared after historical terrorist attack which happened on September 11, 2001.

BASIC CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES ANALYSIS OF THE COUNTERINSURGENCY STRATEGY IN AFGHANISTAN

Lana Đurkin

Summary

When the US and the Allies started the invasion of Afghanistan with the aim of disabling Al-Qa’ida’s activities and toppling of the Taliban regime in 2001, they did not have an idea of the implications caused by inciting occupation of the war-stricken country. They particularly did not make effort to recognize support given to the Taliban regime by the local population as well as the cause for this support. The desire for achieving victory rapidly gave rise to the occurrence of insurgency, firstly in the southern and eastern parts, and later throughout the entire country. Today, the Afghan conflict is defined as a right-down counterinsurgency operation. Unfortunately, it was not until 2007 that more attention was brought to the understanding of the counterinsurgency (COIN) theory and involvement of numerous preconditions essential for success - the joint effort of civilian and military sectors, the understanding and protection of the local population and training of domestic security forces. This article analyses the basic features of NATO counterinsurgency (COIN) strategy in Afghanistan as well as the suggested solutions for success in the framework of cultural norms of the society, which are not to be enforced. As any other, this COIN strategy also presupposes political and social change, given the fact insurgency rarely occurs in stabile and effective societies.

BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AND MILITARY-ECONOMIC DIPLOMACY

Vilko Klasan

Summary

Economic crisis and recession have changed the priorities and contents of work activities in diplomacy, both civil and military. Acquiring economic data in order to assist domestic (military) industry has become the most significant task of diplomatic representatives. Acquiring information about the economy has been developed on the principles of military intelligence activities and in that regard is the intelligence circle of business intelligence very similar to classic military intelligence. Military attache as the cornerstone of military diplomacy can help domestic military production on receiving country’s market by acquiring and analysing economic data.

ITALIAN COLONIALISM IN ERITREA AT THE END OF THE 19th CENTURY – A HISTORICAL REVIEW

David Orlović

Summary

As a minor part of the large wave of conquest of Africa launched by European powers in the last decades of the 19th century, a recently unified Kingdom of Italy began building its own colony on the Red Sea coast, in present-day Eritrea. The local and European historical context, the causes of Italian colonial expansion and chronology of main political and military events, are presented in this paper. The Italian defeat at Adowa in 1896, by the hands of the Ethiopian military, is singled out by the author as the ending of this period of Italian colonialism. Finally, the immediate and long-term consequences of that event are mentioned.

BOOK REVIEWS

Summary

DVADESET GODINA SAMOSTALNE HRVATSKE, Radoslav Zaradić - Goldstein, Ivo (2010.) Dvadeset godina samostalne Hrvatske. Zagreb: Novi Liber, 391 stranica

GLOBALNA GERILA I RAZVOJ ASIMETRIČNIH PRIJETNJI, Darijo Klarić - Robb, John (2007.) Brave New War: The Next Stage of Terrorism and the End of Globalization. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 208 stranica

masthead

Glavni i odgovorni urednik – Editor-in-Chief

Mirko Bilandžić

Izvršni urednik – Executive Editor

Mario Werhas

Organizacijski urednik – Organization Editor

Velimir Milaković

Članovi uredništva – Associate Editors

Branka Galić, Nenad Fanuko, Kruno Kardov, Petra Rodik

Međunarodni urednici – International Editors

Igor Primorac (Melbourne, Australia), Miroslav Hadžić (Beograd, Srbija), Norman Cigar (Vienna, Virginia, USA)

Tajništvo – Secretariat

Ivona Pastor

Izdavački savjet – Advisory Board

Vjekoslav Afrić, Damir Barbarić, Josip Barić, Tomislav Bunjevac, Ivan Cifrić, Ognjen Čaldarović, Benjamin Čulig, Zvonimir Freivogel, Rade Kalanj, Vjeran Katunarić, Vladimir Kolesarić, Mirjana Krizmanić, Krešimir Kufrin, Zvonimir Lerotić, Davorka Matić, Milan Mesić, Robert Mikac, Tomislav Murati, Darko Polšek, Ivo Prodan, Vesna Pusić, Ivan Rogić, Aleksandar Štulhofer, Anton Tus, Radovan Vukadinović, Herman Vukušić

Međunarodni izdavački savjet – International Advisory Board

Anton Bebler (Ljubljana, Slovenia), Janusz Bugajski (Washington DC, USA), Christina Doctare (Stockholm, Sweden), Matthew Friedman (White River Junction, Vermont, USA), Marjan Malešič (Ljubljana, Slovenia), Anton Žabkar (Ljubljana, Slovenia)

UDK – UDS Classification

Josip Prgomet

Lektura i korektura – Editing and proofreading

Ines Trkulja

Grafičko oblikovanje – Art Director

Darko Bednjanec

Web stranice – Webmaster

Zoran Žitnik

Priprema za tisak – Desk Top Publishing

Zoran Žitnik

Tisak – Printed by

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